The TPP and the War on Terror: End of the First Amendment

Much has been said about the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a disturbing trade agreement which has been negotiated in secrecy from Bush II through Obama. Civil liberties groups such as the EFF, and even Congress itself, have been fighting to get in on this, but only leaked portions of the TPP are available. Most recently Wikileaks got the portions dealing with copyright law, the Internet, and drug patents.

While these anti-technology, pro-Dark-Ages provisions are dreadfully disturbing, there is an even more frightening aspect of the TPP which most are ignoring – the arbitration system. Corporations can not only use this system to “sue” each other, but can “sue” governments themselves, including on the grounds that trade is threatened in that country in some way. Any government who uses their laws, politicians, judges, and constitutions in defiance of the arbitration system can be fined and penalized with trade sanctions.

The UN disarmament treaty, in addition to civilian gun elimination, equalizes all nations’ militaries, crippling America’s military resources and improving Iran’s. When the UN disarmament treaty coexists with the TPP, all nations become equal and weak.

America is dependent on the international flow of oil. Without oil, there is no America. OPEC nations, most of which are terrorist sharia states or otherwise have a large Muslim influence, will be able to use the TPP to destroy the First Amendment.

Terrorist attacks and assassinations frequently occur after people insult Muslims or honestly portray Muhammad and the Quran. The Muhammad cartoons in Denmark, Geert Wilders’ movie Fitna, Theo Van Gogh’s movie Submission, the attempts to show and re-air images of Muhammad in South Park, and the subsequent Everybody Draw Muhammad Day campaign on Facebook, have all resulted in threats, injuries, murders, assasinations, and terrorist attacks, all committed by Muslims who want to destroy secular democratic republics and force their governments of dismemberment, castration, beheading, and stoning, on Israel and on all the world.

The TPP makes this brutality ever more possible. When an individual, company, or religious group living under a secular democratic republic exercises their rights to freedom of religion, speech, and the press in a way that offends Muslims, there will be assassinations, bombing of oil wells and oil fields, destruction of military equipment, and more.

These resources are owned by multinational corporations, who are loyal to no flag. Resources may be crucial to another government, as Iranian oil is to Russia. Those who speak the truth about Islam and the Quran, and their government, will be taken to the TPP’s tribunal. All of these people will be liable for the terrorists’ destruction of the resources, and will pay severely with their wallets, freedoms, and perhaps even their lives. In other words, if you criticize Islam, you will be a terrorist.

When discussing, debating, and analyzing part or all of the TPP, we need to go deeper into the consequences of surrendering America. So long as this arbitration system is left in place, all other provisions are irrelevant. With the TPP, there is absolutely no way to know what’s in it, whether we pass it or not.

Creative Commons License
This work, unless otherwise expressly stated, is licensed under a Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal License. Terms and conditions beyond the scope of this license may be available at libertycolumns.com.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to The TPP and the War on Terror: End of the First Amendment

  1. Pingback: LibertyColumns.com 12/27/2013: “The TPP and the War on Terror: End of the First Amendment” | danq.co

  2. Pingback: StopTheSecrecy.org – Stop the Secret TPP! | LibertyColumns.com

  3. Pingback: StopTheSecrecy.org – Stop The Secret TPP! | danq.co

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>